Sharp Cheddar Biscuits
Sharp Cheddar Biscuits

Sharp Cheddar Biscuits

5 from 1 reviews
Sharp Cheddar Biscuits
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
These biscuits were inspired by the delicious biscuits at my local coffee shop. I always order one with sharp cheddar cheese and fresh peach jam and it's the bee's knees! I wanted to recreate that experience at home. These would be slammin' with any homemade fruit jam!
Author:
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons Plugra European Style butter, divided
  • 1 heaping cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • extra butter, honey, and peach jam for serving
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In the bowl of a food processor, combin flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Pulse a few times to combine. Cut 5 tablespoons of the butter into 1/2-inch cubes and add them with the cheese to the food processor. Pulse 5 or 6 times or until the butter is coated in flour and is the size of small peas. Place the mixture in a large bowl and add the milk. Stir with a fork until you form a rough ball of dough.
  2. Flour the counter very well before turning the dough out onto it and patting it into a 1-inch thick rectangle. Fold it over and pat it out into a 1-inch rectangle again. Repeat one more time, this time covering the resulting rectangle with a clean dish towel and letting it rest for 30 minutes.
  3. After the dough has rested, melt the 2 remaining tablespoons of butter in a microwave-safe dish and set it aside. Pat out the dough a bit more into a 10-inch by 6-inch rectangle. Cut the dough into biscuits using a floured glass or cookie cutter, but don't twist the cutter or your biscuits will be less likely to rise. I had some trouble getting nice circles cut out so mine ended up being a little, uh, misshapen, but perhaps yours will be more round. However, if they're not, don't despair: mine tasted amazing despite their wonky shape. Place the biscuits on the prepared baking sheet and bake 10 minutes before brushing the top with the melted butter and continuing to bake for 2-5 minutes longer until the biscuits are golden and firm to the touch. Remove and serve warm with butter, honey, and peach jam.

 

84 Comments on Sharp Cheddar Biscuits and Anti-Racism for White People (Post 1)

  1. ro
    July 20, 2015 at 12:43 am (2 years ago)

    I’m a POC, and I commit.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 12:51 am (2 years ago)

      Thanks for being here, ro!

      Reply
  2. Patty
    July 20, 2015 at 1:44 am (2 years ago)

    I commit. I loved the parable of the pot on the stove.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 1:46 am (2 years ago)

      Thanks for being here, Patty! I loved it too — I’m glad she told it to me.

      Reply
  3. Kelly
    July 20, 2015 at 1:58 am (2 years ago)

    I commit! I also commit to making those biscuits as soon as possible. Peach jam that sounds delightfully Southern!

    Reply
    • Kelly
      July 20, 2015 at 1:59 am (2 years ago)

      *Peach jam sounds delightfully Southern.

      Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:04 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Kelly! And you are so right — peach jam is my jam, pun intended.

      Reply
  4. Becca from It's Yummi!
    July 20, 2015 at 6:24 am (2 years ago)

    I commit, but only if I can have 2 biscuits ,please. One for me and one for the sweet African American lady who stands at the bus stop across the street every morning.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:04 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Becca! I’m all about sharing biscuits!

      Reply
  5. Catherine
    July 20, 2015 at 7:40 am (2 years ago)

    Dear Julie, I commit. I always enjoy reading your thoughtful posts…as you know I am a big fan of your writing.

    These biscuits look fantastic. I would never have thought of having a cheddar biscuit with a fruit jam. What a delicious combo. xo, Catherine

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:03 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Catherine, and for always being so supportive!

      Reply
  6. Judi
    July 20, 2015 at 8:47 am (2 years ago)

    i commit and thank you for posting about this important topic.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:03 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Judi!

      Reply
  7. Julia
    July 20, 2015 at 9:01 am (2 years ago)

    Biscuits are my favorite, especially with cheese involved. These look awesome!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:02 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks, Julia!

      Reply
  8. Emily R
    July 20, 2015 at 9:12 am (2 years ago)

    I commit! Thank you for writing about this important issue.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:02 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Emily!

      Reply
  9. Katrina
    July 20, 2015 at 9:23 am (2 years ago)

    Can’t go wrong with biscuits like these! Love the recipe!!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:02 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks, Katrina!

      Reply
  10. Sara
    July 20, 2015 at 11:47 am (2 years ago)

    I commit! It is hard as a Caucasian to speak out about racism. Some of us feel out of place. Thank you for writing this!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:02 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Sara!

      Reply
  11. Kathleen
    July 20, 2015 at 12:36 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit! Having lived in the deep south my entire life, this post resonates with me. We have to focus on educating ourselves and pulling our heads out of the sand! Thanks for writing!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:01 pm (2 years ago)

      Agree. Thanks Kathleen!

      Reply
  12. DEE ROBERSON
    July 20, 2015 at 1:15 pm (2 years ago)

    Julie, I Commit, after reading your first post the “why” issue was simply stated. Looking forward to future posts I will be posting them on my page for other to see as well. Also, please accept my gratitude for doing this. As a Black person with many White friends, I’ve witnessed the strain they feel when talking about race. I believe that your words will help many come to terms with honestly discussing race issues in the US. Thanks again, dee

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:01 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Dee, and for your kind words!

      Reply
  13. TamTam
    July 20, 2015 at 1:24 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit! (and those biscuits look DELICIOUS)

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:01 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, TamTam!

      Reply
  14. JoAnne Jenkins
    July 20, 2015 at 1:55 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit – and thank you!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:01 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, JoAnne!

      Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 8:00 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks Michelle!

      Reply
  15. Anton
    July 20, 2015 at 9:48 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit – I have a lot of respect for your willingness to engage in the hard work of addressing this topic and how difficult it can be to get that conversation started for white people like me. I grew up being told it was terrible to ever acknowledge there was any difference between me and other people when it came to skin color, so I avoided thinking or discussing issues of racism. I’m very lucky to have an amazing friend whose writing about her experiences as an adopted child of a different race from her parents really opened my eyes up to how different life is for her.

    These biscuits look so good. I love making biscuits.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 11:56 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks Anton, and I love reading your story about growing — thank you for sharing!! What I love most is that you had good intentions throughout, but were 100% willing to listen to someone whose experience differed from your own and validate their experience. You sound like a great friend.

      Reply
  16. Susan
    July 20, 2015 at 10:53 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit……….what a wonderful post. Good for you starting this conversation.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 20, 2015 at 11:55 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Susan!

      Reply
  17. Kirsten
    July 21, 2015 at 1:21 am (2 years ago)

    I commit!

    I recently made a goal to be more educated about things like racism and privilege.
    Thank you for providing a well articulated starting point, with citations!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:20 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Kirsten!

      Reply
  18. Jari J.
    July 21, 2015 at 3:10 am (2 years ago)

    I commit. The day I stop growing is the day I die. People of the world too often default to a group mentality of ‘My group and then all the others’. I want and need to have my thoughts stimulated and my horizons pushed. Thanks you for being willing to write this.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:20 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Jari!

      Reply
  19. Pamela
    July 21, 2015 at 3:43 am (2 years ago)

    Very thoughtful writing. It is very difficult to talk about race for most white people. Some black people want us to feel guilty for being white.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:19 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks, Pamela! I want to probe further into that conclusion and I think the next post will be helpful in doing that. I find myself wondering what it would benefit a black person to have us feel guilty and instinctively thinking that’s not a reasonable end goal. I think it makes sense that black people would want us to be accountable for what’s happening for sure — in order that we change it. But beyond that, I don’t think our feelings do much for them in general. I have seen a certain phenomenon where folks are discussing a problem they are having in their community and a white person says something to the effect of, “But I didn’t do that, and I didn’t own slaves, and I don’t discriminate against people of color, so it’s not my fault” — something very defensive that indicates they felt accused or felt like someone wanted them to feel guilty even though the actual discussion was just about others’ experiences. I’ve felt these defensive feelings too, but I think they have more to do with what’s going on inside of ME than what “black people want” or are doing. My next post will elaborate! Thanks for being here!

      Reply
      • Payton
        July 21, 2015 at 7:53 pm (2 years ago)

        I just finished this recipe – amazing, by the way! – and was scrolling through the comments again. There’s a fantastic speech that everyone should read that was published online at the beginning of this month. It is called “I, Racist” by John Metta. I think it is a good follow up read to this blog post (:

        Reply
        • Julie Ruble
          July 22, 2015 at 2:45 pm (2 years ago)

          Thanks Payton! I have seen that sermon shared around and have it bookmarked but haven’t read it yet. Off I go to read! Here is the link for others who want to read: I, Racist

          Reply
  20. Milagritos
    July 21, 2015 at 7:21 am (2 years ago)

    Hi Julie, I commit. As an Asian woman living in Australia I have encountered incidences of racism, some are subtle and mostly unintended while others are not so. Being married to a caucasian allows me to highlight and appreciate the differences in our worlds. Thanks so much for doing this important work. I believe that this conversation will help us find common ground with groups of people we find ourselves excluding from our lives – mostly unintentionally. I admire your gutsy writing (and really gorgeous recipes!) and have been a lurker for a while. Please count me in!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:22 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing and for sharing your own experience! I can only imagine how eye-opening it must be to see both your own experience and your spouse’s as you go out and about!

      Reply
  21. Rebecca
    July 21, 2015 at 7:31 am (2 years ago)

    I commit. Your courage is inspiring.

    A wonderful quote worth sharing even if already well-known…
    “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies but the silence of our friends.”
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Rebecca!

      Reply
  22. Petrea
    July 21, 2015 at 8:59 am (2 years ago)

    I commit!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Petrea!

      Reply
  23. Payton
    July 21, 2015 at 9:24 am (2 years ago)

    You have a brand new reader/subscriber to your blog. What’s better than controversial discussions told in such an elegant way, and amazing looking food? I commit.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks so much, Payton!

      Reply
  24. Robin
    July 21, 2015 at 10:20 am (2 years ago)

    I commit. Thank you for such thoughtful words. I need this.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:21 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks for committing, Robin!

      Reply
  25. Jane S
    July 21, 2015 at 10:23 am (2 years ago)

    Thanks Julie, for another thought provoking post! Can’t wait for the follow-up. It is always beneficial to take a step outside our comfort zone when thinking about these hard to address topics!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:20 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks, Jane!

      Reply
  26. Tiffany
    July 21, 2015 at 10:32 am (2 years ago)

    Thank you for addressing the race issues in this country at such a time when so many have chosen to ignore it.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 21, 2015 at 12:20 pm (2 years ago)

      Thank YOU for being here, Tiffany!

      Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:43 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks so much!

      Reply
  27. Nutmeg Nanny
    July 21, 2015 at 5:08 pm (2 years ago)

    For the most part I stay away from racism chats because I find myself non-confrontational and not educated enough with facts to speak my opinion clearly. I know personally I have found myself sickened by some of the people I know on FB. Their opinions on certain topics just make my skin crawl. (Also these biscuits look totally kicks ass 😉

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:44 pm (2 years ago)

      This series will hopefully be helpful — I am excited to provide a lot of the resources that have been produced lately that are accessible and quick to digest for folks for whom this isn’t their life study, but who also do want to be educated. Hope you enjoy it! Thanks!

      Reply
  28. Debbie
    July 21, 2015 at 5:54 pm (2 years ago)

    Thank you Julie- it’s easy to commit to reading anything you have to say, so of course, I’m on board. You have such a fair, measured way of presenting one of the most difficult topics we Americans have to grapple with today. Although you are passionate about seeking a solution you are so emotionally intelligent about your approach. I am in awe!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:44 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks so much, Debbie — that is very kind of you to say!

      Reply
  29. Kristin
    July 22, 2015 at 11:58 am (2 years ago)

    I commit! Also, to these cheesey biscuits. <3

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:45 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks Kristin!!

      Reply
  30. Wilma
    July 22, 2015 at 12:45 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit. Thanks for being brave enough to write about this tough subject.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:45 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks Wilma!

      Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 22, 2015 at 2:47 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks, AKM, and thanks for the link! This is a topic I’ve been invested in for over a decade, but I sense this moment in history might be unique and full of potential. So many wonderful resources are being produced and have been produced — I’m happy to add these to my to-read list.

      Reply
  31. Leslie C
    July 24, 2015 at 8:31 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit, Julie. Timely, important, inescapable.

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 24, 2015 at 11:03 pm (2 years ago)

      Thank you, Leslie!

      Reply
  32. Sherri
    July 25, 2015 at 1:09 am (2 years ago)

    I commit…..those biscuits look and sound amazing!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 26, 2015 at 10:42 pm (2 years ago)

      Thank you, Sherri!

      Reply
  33. Lauren at Keep It Sweet
    July 26, 2015 at 6:49 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit!
    I love this so much, Julie. I’m so glad you are starting this series and look forward to reading your posts. Racism is something I think about regularly, especially now that I”m raising a child. My husband and I regularly talk about how we can prevent L from thinking negatively about someone who might seem or look different from him. Thanks for starting this topic on your blog!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 26, 2015 at 10:53 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks so much, Lauren! And I really admire you for thinking ahead on this one! Here is an organization I saw recently that you might find valuable: http://www.raceconscious.org/

      Reply
  34. Nirali
    July 26, 2015 at 8:58 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit! Julie, you are making it very easy and comfortable to ‘wet my toes’ with the subject. And I am not a big baker ( just a mom of a future one😉)! I love to read how beautifully you present and incorporate life topics with your baking!

    Reply
    • Julie Ruble
      July 26, 2015 at 10:53 pm (2 years ago)

      Love that future baker! Thanks, Nirali!!

      Reply
  35. Katherine
    August 4, 2015 at 3:12 pm (2 years ago)

    THANK YOU for this blog–I love food blogs, but it’s really discouraging that most of the ones I stumble across have little to do with what is actually happening in the world outside the blogger’s kitchen. Your pictures are beautiful and your recipes look delicious (can’t wait to try out the recipe that accompanies part two of this series!) but your real-life stories and reminders are even more important.
    Food is meant to be shared with people/community, and activism and change needs a strong community.

    Reply
  36. Jo
    August 14, 2015 at 2:22 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit. 🙂

    Reply
  37. Jen
    August 14, 2015 at 4:42 pm (2 years ago)

    Linked here from APracticalWedding.com’s link roundup, so I’m a brand spanking new reader of yours, but I totally commit. Working to end racism as a white person is a new calling for me that is weighing heavily on my heart, for some of the reasons you mentioned about not knowing enough, upsetting people, etc. I remind myself every day that I may ruffle feathers and get yelled at, but at least my life is not threatened and demeaned just because of the color of my skin. When I get overwhelmed and want to just walk away, I remember that people of color can’t just walk away – they live this every day, so I can suck it up and keep advocating. We are actually looking into starting a chapter of Standing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) here in my city, which is really exciting, and comforting to know I’m not the only white person in my community feeling the same urge to stop being silent and start working to address racism. Thank you so much for this post and the courage it took to write it!

    Reply
  38. Liz
    August 14, 2015 at 6:04 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit.

    Also, I’m a (white, female) professor at a university with mostly white, first-generation college students from small towns. I teach a class on women in science and technology, but in class discussions and in journal entries, race often gets brought up.

    I’m dying for articles/things to say/etc. to students who think racism doesn’t exist, or (horrifyingly common) that they themselves are victims of “reverse racism” because there aren’t scholarships marked specifically for white boys, or whatever. It’s so frustrating.

    So this is a great read. Thank you.

    Reply
  39. Steph
    August 16, 2015 at 6:54 pm (2 years ago)

    I commit!

    Reply
  40. Ruth
    August 18, 2015 at 8:46 am (2 years ago)

    I commit!

    Reply
  41. Lynne Favreau
    January 1, 2016 at 8:43 am (1 year ago)

    I commit.

    WOW. How lovely is this? Thoughtful, insightful dialog about racism, and recipes with delightful photos?

    This might sound silly, I don’t even know you, but I’m so proud of you for writing this.

    And thank you. I’m always looking for ways to engage people in conversation about racism and white privilege but my methodology isn’t nearly as accessible as yours.

    I do strive to take the edge off my incredulous nature (seriously, how can you deny white privilege?) having found anger not very conducive to discourse.

    I’m adding you to my list of resources for civil (and creative) ways to address racism.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *